Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon: Holman Old Testament Commentary by David Moore and Daniel Akin. What are the mandrakes mentioned in the Bible? Proverbs 5:19 Let her be as the loving hind and pleasant roe; let her breasts satisfy thee at all times; and be thou ravished always with her love. My love.--Here almost certainly in the concrete, though there is no instance of such use except in this and the corresponding passages. The LXX. Matthew 26:63 But Jesus held his peace. New King James Version And the high priest answered and said unto him, I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God. strangely read, by the powers and virtues of the field. It’s a solemn charge, given by one who has found true love and is experiencing its joys. Jerusalem -- probably 'foundation of peace', capital city of all Israel, Verb - Hifil - Perfect - first person common singular, Verb - Hifil - Imperfect - second person masculine plural, Verb - Piel - Imperfect - second person masculine plural, Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Conjunctive imperfect - third person feminine singular, To incline to, to bend, to be pleased with, desire. O daughters of Jerusalem, I adjure you: Do not arouse or awaken love until the time is right. The "daughters of Jerusalem" are present only in the poet's imagination. O daughters of Jerusalem, I adjure you by the gazelles and does of the field: Do not arouse or awaken love until the time is right. It is his manner to fancy the presence of spectators of his happiness and to call on outsiders to share his bliss (comp. The poet imagines his beloved sleeping in his arms, and playfully bids her companions keep from intruding on her slumbers. This verse (which is repeated in Song of Solomon 3:5; Song of Solomon 8:4) marks natural breaks in the poem and adds to the dramatic effect. Daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you by the gazelles and by the does of the field: Do not arouse or awaken love until it so desires. New American Standard Bible "I want you to swear, O daughters of Jerusalem, Do not arouse or awaken my love Until she pleases." I charge you, O you daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that you stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please. The speaker addresses the “ daughters of Jerusalem ”—young, unmarried women in Israel’s capital city—and gives them some wise advice. I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up, nor awaken love, until it please. Why is there an entire book of the Bible dedicated to romantic love. Read, till she please. But there is no occasion to imagine a real stage, with actors grouped upon it. Like Spenser, in his Epithalamium, this poet "unto himself alone will sing;" but he calls on all things bright and beautiful in the world of nature and man to help him to solemnise this joyful rite, and now the moment has come when he bids "the maids and young men cease to sing. New King James Version Song of Solomon 3:11; Song of Solomon 5:16; Song of Solomon 6:13, &c), and it is on this imaginary theatre which his love conjures up that the curtain falls, here and in other places, on the union of the happy pair. New American Standard Bible "I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, By the gazelles or by the hinds of the field, That you will not arouse or awaken my love Until she pleases." Why did God allow Solomon to have 1,000 wives and concubines? Song of Solomon 5:8,16 I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love…. Song of Solomon 8:4 I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up, nor awake my love, until he please. I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that you stir not up, nor awake my love, until he please. (See Genesis 49:21.) Do not attempt to arouse or awaken love. Ephesians 5:22-33 Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord…. What does it mean that the Shulammite had dark skin (Song of Solomon 1:6)? Do not awaken love until it pleases. In the Song of Solomon, why is it said that we shouldn’t awaken love until it pleases? The Authorised Version, "till he please," is a mistake in grammar. Is Song of Solomon an allegory of God’s love for Israel and/or Christ’s love for the Church? Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, OT Poetry: Song of Solomon 8:4 I adjure you daughters of Jerusalem that (Song Songs SS So Can) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools.